Future Camp

Future Camp

MORNING SESSIONS

  • Part One – Join Our Expedition
    Consider this camp an expeditionary force. The future is a North Sea filled with fury. Small, vicious changes arrive to threaten us with transformation. Big "storm systems" come barging in and leave no doubt. (They mean to change everything and sometimes do.) At any given moment, we are standing on the brig staring out at an astonishing number of competing ideas, forces, factors, values and people. The future is a house of many mansions. This first lecture is the picture of the day ahead and the system of predictions, models, methods, and maps we will use to make sense of it.

    Part Two – Finding the Future
    So how do we find the future? In this lecture, we will cover the data sources, quantitative (we'll give a list of sources and a demo of how to use them) and qualitative (and here you get a quick course on ethnographic listening). With the right lens, virtually all data sources are useful: social media, spoken language, legacy media, popular culture (all those celebrities coming and going) alternative data (geolocation, betting markets, C suite trends, SKU data). The real skill to be cultivated here is the ability to figure out what a data point is telling us. We will work on our "pattern recognition” and how to build “container concepts” to frame new data.

    Part Three – Mapping the Future
    Because the future teems with so many different possibilities, we want to begin by mapping anything that makes us go "hmm." And then track it as is scales up and falls away. This takes a special method of data management. I use Personal Knowledge Management (PKM) systems called Tana and Hepta. (There are plenty of other options here [e.g., Obsidian and Scrivinal).] These are too complicated to teach in an hour. But I can make the introduction and get you started. I will also show how to handle an individual trend, how to break it into its components, how to put it in new combinations and constellations, and not least how to use AI to build scenarios that help us see which way the future might break.